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View Full Version : Some laws are unworkcable



Xtrem
02-19-2004, 04:31 AM
This is a new law in Germany. As you will read you may be shocked you may love it. But consider the impact on the American economy if it was to be a new law in the USA

http://www.resol.com.br/curiosidades2_ing.asp?id=1201

Xtrem
02-19-2004, 04:43 AM
Before anyone says "the law is older than a year"

This is what people still think in October

http://www.recyclingtoday.com/News/news.asp?Id=4716

Terry K
02-19-2004, 05:57 AM
Originally posted by Xtrem:
Before anyone says "the law is older than a year"

This is what people still think in October

http://www.recyclingtoday.com/News/news.asp?Id=4716 That's about as bad as California's half-baked CRV program. CRV works off of the idea that you pay 4 cents for cans and bottles under 24 oz, and 8 cents for containers over 24 oz.

However, recycling centres aren't obligated to pay you that. They can pay you per-pound, which in many cases works out to be less than what you paid to begin with.

CRV is a ripoff and I honestly hope its done away with.

RunWithDaLilGuy
02-19-2004, 03:59 PM
always wondered what CRV meant

No Soda
02-24-2004, 09:36 PM
Eleven states in this country have bottle bills, and more would if the soft drink industry didn't spend millions lobbying against their passage. Bottle bills place the burden and cost of disposing of soft drink packages on the producers and consumers, where it belongs. The soft drink industry's position is that communities should foot the bill through taxpayer-supported curbside recycling programs, which capture only a small amount of containers. Contrary to the opinions of some, soft drinks in bottle bill states cost no more than in other states. The ten states with bottle bills recycle more beverage containers than all the others combined. The soft drink industry's shameful position on deposit legislation is all the more ironic since they invented the deposit return system a centry ago with refillable bottles.

RunWithDaLilGuy
02-24-2004, 11:32 PM
how come a can of coke on average costs one dollar in most vending machines, but the average price in georgia or tennessee or kentucky is 25-35-45 cents?

the prices go up because of the loss of money by beverage distributors from outside cans. now technology is getting better so that they have different barcodes for different states, but still, every year, people try the old seinfeld trick.

that being said, michigan is a much cleaner place than ohio for that reason.

when i used to go to kentucky in the holler, the roads are just littered with plastic mountain dew bottles. shameful, it's such a beautiful state.

XLS_04
02-25-2004, 12:56 AM
i noticed almost everything down south is cheaper.

however some states like california and hawaii, etc.. the prices are higher than most states.

RunWithDaLilGuy
02-25-2004, 10:25 PM
hawaii - everything costs more there.

california - everything costs more there.

nuff said.