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jblavit
03-07-2005, 10:56 PM
I was just wondering on pop cans and bottles it says you can get 10 cents in Michigan for turning them in and there are some other states where you can get about 5 cents. My question is for someone who lives there or anybody who knows can you really get 10 cents for a pop can? and is there convinent places to drop them off? I mean it is fareley easy to pick up ten pop cans off the ground and that would be a dollar right??

Damon
03-07-2005, 11:53 PM
You are correct !!! Michigan wants you to recycle if you do not you are out 10 cents per can.

gregmech26
03-08-2005, 01:29 AM
We have paper bags set aside for our empty cans/bottles in our home. Once we have 10 bags full, we take them to the nearest grocery store and get our deposit back...usually $20. It can be a messy job, but electronic "bottle return" machines make it an easy job (as long as the bar code is readable).

Robot
03-08-2005, 01:35 AM
recycling cans is basically the only recycling which is actually helpful.. plastic, and etc.. not really.

check out penn and tellers show "bull****", and their episode on recycling.. amazing episode.

Lepke
03-08-2005, 06:29 AM
jblavit You do pay 5 or 10 cents over the price of the product as a deposit.
So this is not free money.

jblavit
03-08-2005, 06:44 PM
but if you collect them off the ground it's easy money

Lepke
03-08-2005, 07:25 PM
easy? i don't think so.

jblavit
03-08-2005, 08:35 PM
Why is it not easy to pick up pop cans off the ground??

Damon
03-08-2005, 11:44 PM
Its only free money if you didn't pay the deposit.

Android
03-09-2005, 12:32 AM
And you can't crush the cans - they have to be intact in order to get your deposit back.

By the way, in deposit states you won't likely see very many pop cans on the ground. Deposit laws really do work.

I've often wondered if returnables would have survived to the present day had universal deposit laws been enacted in the early 60's - back when returnables hadn't been phased out yet.

andy

glassbottlesrule
03-09-2005, 07:33 PM
It's not free money. You have to pay the dime when you buy the pop. Only place you can return the cans is at stores where they are sold to begin with. Most major retailers use machines that read the bar cod and only take cans sold in the state. Stores limit the amount that can be returned at any one time as well.

Damon
03-09-2005, 08:26 PM
Recycling is a waste for the most part. Read Penn and Teller about Recycling and you will crack up.

fusion
03-09-2005, 08:43 PM
Plastic recycling is ineffective, but can recycling is actually a very good thing.

jblavit
03-09-2005, 09:19 PM
I live in Minnesota but it still has the MI 10 cents thing on there. So have I paid an extra dime?

jblavit
03-09-2005, 11:53 PM
So if they are crushed they don't take them??

jrlead
03-10-2005, 08:50 AM
The machines that read the bar code won't work if they are crushed.

glassbottlesrule
03-10-2005, 04:38 PM
It is Illegal to return the cnas if the deposit wasn't paid in the first place. The only reason the deposit was started was to clean up the ground not enrich people who havn't paid the deposit in the first place.

gregmech26
03-11-2005, 12:00 AM
When was the last time someone had been prosecuted for that? The Boy Scouts fundraise door-to-door soliciting for returnables on a regular basis.

[ 03-11-2005, 12:05 AM: Message edited by: gregmech26 ]

Rollerwings
03-11-2005, 04:15 PM
I lived in NY while at college, and plenty of money could be found by picking up beer and pop bottles and cans for a nickel apiece. In 1998, a friend and I gathered almost $100 worth of empties after a concert by the Tragically Hip. We were able to return them to any grocery store, except ALDI, which has its own can deposit due to a different price structure. ALDI pop cans had to go back to ALDI stores for the same reason; other stores wouldn't take them.

In town, it wasn't too easy to find enough cans. It would not be worth the gas money to drive around gathering them. But on a college campus where many students just didn't care, it was easy to find a lot.

Remey688
03-11-2005, 05:12 PM
Originally posted by jblavit:
but if you collect them off the ground it's easy money That is the basic idea. If one desposed of a can, he is out the dime et al, and you who return the can gain the dime or the nickel. Really simple when one thinks about it!

[ 03-11-2005, 05:14 PM: Message edited by: Remey688 ]

ithastabeshasta
03-11-2005, 05:49 PM
Originally posted by jblavit:
I live in Minnesota but it still has the MI 10 cents thing on there. So have I paid an extra dime? No you have not!

drpep
03-11-2005, 06:25 PM
Originally posted by gregmech26:
When was the last time someone had been prosecuted for that? The Boy Scouts fundraise door-to-door soliciting for returnables on a regular basis. When the scouts come to your door and collect your cans YOU paid the deposit. They get it back, you don't. It's called a donation.

RunWithDaLilGuy
03-11-2005, 09:57 PM
Man people, it's simple.

You go to the store. Pick up a six pack of beer, four pack of wine coolers or any carbonated soda. Hawaiian Punch and Country Time, for example, are non-deposit beverages. bottled water too.

They charge you, say, 2.99. then they add, say, .60 cents for a six pack. there's the deposit you paid.

Now it's your responsibility to return the cans, preferably clean, back to the store you bought them at. you can return coke cans to any store, but certain stores such as Kroger, will not accept Wal-mart store brand cans, because Kroger didn't charge you the deposit. But Kroger will accept any coke cans that you bought anywhere else, because the machines that crush the cans read the bar code and assign the deposits to each company that services the store.

The major grocery stores in the lansing Area, Meijer (www.meijer.com) take it waaaaaaaay more cans and bottles than they sell. It's kind of a service, but they give us the bill.

If coke shows up at the back door with a load of pop for Meijer store number 174, they access the bottle machine computer and find out how many Coke Product deposits they received since the last delivery. Then that money is taken off of the bill for the soda, and thus the store is fully refunded for the cans (but not the labor or the machinery to do the sorting).

MISTICman
03-12-2005, 12:27 AM
Huh...
This has me wondering...are New Jersy, Penn., Delaware, or Tenn. deposit states? I was gonna do some soda shopping there. I exclusively get drinks in cans because it's easier to store them.

gregmech26
03-12-2005, 03:37 AM
Originally posted by dr pepperman:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by gregmech26:
When was the last time someone had been prosecuted for that? The Boy Scouts fundraise door-to-door soliciting for returnables on a regular basis. When the scouts come to your door and collect your cans YOU paid the deposit. They get it back, you don't. It's called a donation. </font>[/QUOTE]That's exactly my point.

When was the last time someone was prosecuted for returning an empty bottle that THEY didn't pay the original deposit on?

Rollerwings
03-12-2005, 06:58 PM
MISTICman, the states that require a deposit should be printed on top of the can, along with the amount of the deposit. PA is not a deposit state and we have the empties along our roads to prove it, though we do get 55 cents a pound at a private recycling company at the time of this posting!

RunWithDaLilGuy
03-12-2005, 07:54 PM
greg - i don't think you get it, still.

the law says that you cannot return cans that you or anyone else paid deposit on. that means cans from ohio, indiana, illinois or the 34 other states that do not have bottle deposit laws. collecting cans for charity is totally legal.

gregmech26
03-12-2005, 08:20 PM
Originally posted by RunWithDaLilGuy:
greg - i don't think you get it, still.

the law says that you cannot return cans that you or anyone else paid deposit on. that means cans from ohio, indiana, illinois or the 34 other states that do not have bottle deposit laws. collecting cans for charity is totally legal. What law are you talking about?

If I paid a deposit on a can, I'm certainly entitled to return the can to get my deposit back. That's the entire point of the deposit.

The Boy Scouts aren't can collectors. The Scouts solicit for returnables to redeem the deposit.

[ 03-12-2005, 08:30 PM: Message edited by: gregmech26 ]

RunWithDaLilGuy
03-12-2005, 11:58 PM
the law says you cannot return cans that anyone did NOT pay deposit on. in my haste in replying to the post i forgot to add a "not."

to clarify for non-depositors, if you pay for a can of soda in michigan, you pay 65 cents plus ten cents. at vending machines ,the deposit is implied, although sometimes you see $1.10 where the deposit has obviously been added. you then take that can or bottle and redeem it at a store for your ten cents back. you can either take your dime, or have it credited towards your next purchase.


now greg, since you live in michigan, how could you not know the bottle law?