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David J.
04-10-2006, 09:37 AM
I picked some of this up at a dollar store, and it isn't bad for the price (a six pack was a buck!)

Lepke
04-10-2006, 09:46 AM
A dollar store is where it belongs. Just one more crappy drink that tried to ride the red bull wave and popular ghetto culture.

DudeMan
04-12-2006, 06:06 AM
I don't doubt that the product is crap. But I didn't think that even a product backed by the marketing support of a rapper/producer would end up in the dollar store. I wonder what they did wrong.

greg
04-12-2006, 11:28 AM
Maybe they would have been more successful if they named it something a little more sexual, or targeted a market smaller than the average mans Hat size, or gave it a cultural specific name, or had sexually suggestive graphics on it, or suggested its use was almost illegal, or named it after a recreational drug, or named after a football player, baseball player, actor, etc, or (insert joke here).

Lepke
04-12-2006, 11:45 AM
The defcon thing is a Russell Simmons thing. Making his money by promoting gang culture to American youth.

greg
04-12-2006, 12:47 PM
Originally posted by Lepke:
The defcon thing is a Russell Simmons thing. Making his money by promoting gang culture to American youth. Proving my point that Big Names and/or culturally specific names do not sell drinks on their own.
He probably figured his name would get him in the door to major distributors and all he got was small time guys pimping it in liqour stores.

David J.
04-12-2006, 07:38 PM
I don't care who's backing what product, but I can't complain for a measly dollar. Another man's trash is another man's tresure.

Lepke
04-12-2006, 08:44 PM
True enough David. One mans meat is another’s poison. One manes garbage is another mans gold. And so on.

Nick Laugher
04-14-2006, 12:10 AM
6 pack for a buck?! damn!

Ron Swedelson
04-17-2006, 06:17 PM
How is Russel Simmons promoting the gang culture?

Lepke
04-17-2006, 06:22 PM
Rap and hip hop among other urban ghetto ventures. Is promoting and sanctioning gang culture and violence.
You may have another opinion, but this is my opinion.

Ron Swedelson
04-19-2006, 05:17 PM
alright...just wish you knew the difference between gangster rap and hip hop...two totaly different types...so I would have to say you are wrong that you think Def Con is promoting the "gang" life style. If you wanted to say that drink does not sell and wastes space...I'll agree with you there...but thats about it

Lepke
04-19-2006, 05:34 PM
Ron,
I personally believe there is no difference between “gangsta” rap and hip-hop.
Def Con is part of a violent lawless subculture that is only serving to harm the youth of our inner cities and our society in general.

And the drink is a dog that taste terrible, collects dust and wastes valuable self-space.

But I hope we can agree to disagree and that there are no hard feelings. We have both been on this board a long time and I have learned a lot from you.

David J.
04-19-2006, 07:39 PM
Hey, I wanted to talk about the drink, not complain about gangsta culture.

Lepke
04-19-2006, 07:49 PM
David, things just sort of go off on tangents around here.
You never know where a thread will end up.

David J.
04-19-2006, 07:51 PM
Oh, OK. I just wondered if anyone else had the drink, or heard about it. I still have yet to buy more, if it any is still at the store.

Lepke
04-19-2006, 08:03 PM
Everyone in the industry has heard of it.
You are the only person I’ve ever heard liking it.
If you like it, you’d better go get all you can because I don’t think you’ll see it again.

DJ HawaiianShirt
04-19-2006, 08:15 PM
Originally posted by Lepke:

I personally believe there is no difference between “gangsta” rap and hip-hop.
That's incorrect.
Don't believe what you hear on Fox News.

Mr Zabe
04-19-2006, 08:27 PM
IMO
I think that the culture of Gangster Rap and Hip Hop Rap does have a lot in common. I watch way more MTV than I care to admit. I watch some of the videos but mainly I watch just about every show that gets on MTV.

IMO
If you watch Cribbs, you can see that they share a value set,a certain kind of cultural elitism that appears to make them more similar than different. Now I'm not making a derogatory statement just an observation.

One of the most interesting things I see is that in many of their homes,hip hop and gangster you will find Scare Face posters and or a room celebrating Scare Face. IMO this is just a cultural thing that brings them together like conservative and orthodox Jews buying KFP soda pop.

This is not all bad at all but it does promote the hard/negative stereotype of this culture. So the point is if an energy drink is promoted by a raper there will be some (not all) association with the negative aspects of this culture.

It's a real fine line. IMO

[ 04-19-2006, 08:32 PM: Message edited by: Mr Zabe ]

Lepke
04-19-2006, 08:39 PM
Very insightful post Grand Master Zabe

DJ HawaiianShirt
04-19-2006, 08:52 PM
Of course Gangsta Rap and Hip Hop have alot in common. That's because Gangsta Rap is a sub-genre of the Hip Hop music style.

Gangsta Rap is very negative. It involves mostly lyrics about crime.

But not all Hip Hop music is about crime.

I do agree that Gangsta Rap is not a wholesome choice of music for children.

Check it out. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gangsta_rap)

Techne
04-19-2006, 09:43 PM
Wow. Lepke. That's...... F*cked up, if I may say so.

Hip-hop does not promote gang culture. As DJ HS said, gangsta rap a subgenre of hip-hop, but only a small percentage of hip-hop artists have actual gang connections. I think you're confusing violence for gang violence, and again, violent rap only makes up a certain portion of the hip-hop world.

Prior to the early 90s, gangsta rap barely existed. Like in any genre, of course, there are those who choose to express their anger through music, but back then, hip-hop was either fun loving and light hearted or had a serious message. How can you say that a genre whose first major hit was based on a sample of "Good Times"? You yourself even reference one of hip-hop's early pioneers, who certainly was no gangster himself.

Say what you want about gangsta rap--violence of any kind is a negative influence on society. But shame on you for turning your back on an entire genre of music because of one facet of it. Such willful ignorance is just as detrimental to society as violence.

[ 04-19-2006, 09:45 PM: Message edited by: Techne ]

Lepke
04-19-2006, 10:02 PM
I believe calling hip-hop “music” is stretching it. I see little if any musical value in hip hop.

Techne
04-19-2006, 10:23 PM
After years of studying music, I've learned that silence is just as important as sound. Time for some silence.

I'm done with this topic. Don't worry about being banned for speaking the truth anytime soon--ignorance is far from fact.

Mr Zabe
04-19-2006, 10:26 PM
Reminds me of a certain President who said,
"it depends on the meaning of the word is." LMAO

Lepke
04-19-2006, 10:43 PM
Originally posted by Techne:
After years of studying music, I've learned that silence is just as important as sound. Time for some silence.

I'm done with this topic. Don't worry about being banned for speaking the truth anytime soon--ignorance is far from fact. WOW that was harsh.