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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    16

    Default Coke considering dropping HFCS?

    Coke scared by climbing corn syrup prices - Mar. 12, 2007

    In short, corn syrup prices are rising and Coke is looking into other alternatives.

    CHICAGO (Reuters) -- Coca-Cola may investigate alternatives to high fructose corn syrup, its main sweetener in the U.S. market, because of high corn prices, a company executive said Monday.
    Young also said he would not be surprised if Coca-Cola was looking at switching to different sweeteners. However he said he did not have enough information to say whether this could involve a move to sugar or Splenda from corn syrup.
    The potential return of cane sugar? Dare we dream it?

  2. #2

    Default

    Young also said he would not be surprised if Coca-Cola was looking at switching to different sweeteners. However he said he did not have enough information to say whether this could involve a move to sugar or Splenda from corn syrup
    Splenda?

    Let's hope it's cane sugar!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Brunswick, NJ
    Posts
    754

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iowacity View Post
    Splenda?
    They'd have to be out of their minds if they seriously considered that.

    Let's hope it's cane sugar!
    My hopes aren't that high, but it's nice to think about.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    245

    Default

    You can dream, but I do not believe there is any way sugar will be HFCS's replacement. HFCS may be increasing in price at alarming rates, but still sugar is even higher. The soft drink companies have 25 years invested in HFCS.

    I think there may also be one more dirty little secret. HFCS may have increased soft drink consumption. I'm not suggesting that it is addictive itself. But I do believe it leaves the drinker wanting more from not feeling full. If so, replacing it could be a huge financial mistake.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    312

    Default

    The whole deal is a function of simple economics. The idea is that energy policy is going to create a demand for alcohol made from corn, for motor fuel use, thus raising the price of other corn based products.

    That this might cause a switch to sugar has two problems. One is that you can make alcohol from sugar as well. In fact sugar is a better source of alcohol than corn is. So any spike in alcohol demand is going to suck more refined white sugar from the market than it is corn. The other is that as soon as demand for oil goes down, the price will go down, too. Which means if alcohol as a motor fuel (E-85) actually works, absent some monkeying with the free market via extreme tax breaks, it won't work because oil will drop and the cycle will restart.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Sacramento
    Posts
    52

    Unhappy Sugar prices rise 1st

    My understanding is that sugar prices rose first. Once sugar prices rose, then the HFCS people rose their prices. HFCS is almost always on par with sugar... a little less in cost, but the differential is always pretty close. Biofuels have not had a impact on HFCS. It's the fact that sugar prices rose that enabled the HFCS folks to raise their prices.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,752

    Default

    maybe if castro dies and we start trading with cuba again, then... maybe they'll switch to real sugar.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    245

    Default

    The corn lobby is too strong for even that to help. The is nothing free-market about it.

    US sugar - Tariffs and quotas to keep price artficially high

    HFCS - Derived from subsidized corn. So the price is in fact, artificially low.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Ponca City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    29

    Default Watered Down Coke?

    "The new syrup formulations, which Young said will start rolling out in 2007 and be adopted more widely in 2008 and 2009, would make soft drinks at a ratio of one part syrup to seven to eight parts water. Most current formulations yield one part syrup to five or 5.5 parts water, he said."

    Does this mean that Coke would be watered down? I'm wondering what the taste ramifications on this syrup "reformulation" are going to be. It sounds like a lot more drastic taste difference than just a change in sweetener.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    245

    Default

    Right now there is roughly two pounds of HFCS (HFCS-55, I believe) in 288 fl oz of Coke. That's a case of cans. Sucralose is many, many times sweeter than any HFCS or sucrose. Reducing the syrup ratio sounds a whole lot like it might be a Sucralose-HFCS concoction. Or maybe HFCS-90.

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