Bevboard


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    352

    Default Stevia: Natural or Artificial?

    I recently posted a news item on BevReview.com about the whole Sprite Green/Sobe LifeWater/Stevia sweetener buzz that has been making news here on BevNET and other places.

    My article prompted some interesting reactions from folks on various websites. For example, take a look at the comments to the story or this post on another forum

    There seems to be a contention that this new sweetener is considered "natural", while I made the claim in my article that it was "artificial".

    Now, I don't claim to be the expert on such things, so I figured I'd open this up to folks who may know more than me. Reading what I've linked to and what you know about the new Truvia/PureVia sweeteners, etc., would you consider this new breed of sweeteners to be natural or artificial? Would you place it along side sugar, or would you group it with aspertame, Ace-K, and sucralose?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Rockford, IL
    Posts
    173

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tannerman View Post
    I recently posted a news item on BevReview.com about the whole Sprite Green/Sobe LifeWater/Stevia sweetener buzz that has been making news here on BevNET and other places.

    My article prompted some interesting reactions from folks on various websites. For example, take a look at the comments to the story or this post on another forum

    There seems to be a contention that this new sweetener is considered "natural", while I made the claim in my article that it was "artificial".

    Now, I don't claim to be the expert on such things, so I figured I'd open this up to folks who may know more than me. Reading what I've linked to and what you know about the new Truvia/PureVia sweeteners, etc., would you consider this new breed of sweeteners to be natural or artificial? Would you place it along side sugar, or would you group it with aspertame, Ace-K, and sucralose?
    I have only smoked it, so I'm not sure how I feel about it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,752

    Cool

    it will never be "natural" enough for some people... and the rest of us won't care either way.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Thomasville, NC
    Posts
    444

    Post

    The whole "natural" vs. "artificial" argument is silly. Food and drink makers like to call their products "all-natural" because many people believe that anything produced naturally is good for you. That's the basis of the organic food craze.

    Just because a chemical is man-made, however, does not mean that it's bad for you. Many drugs are artificial compounds, but they have huge benefits.

    Likewise, just because something occurs in nature doesn't mean that it's good for you. Aflatoxins, for example, are all-natural:

    Aflatoxin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,752

    Cool

    well said!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by CitrusCola View Post
    The whole "natural" vs. "artificial" argument is silly. Food and drink makers like to call their products "all-natural" because many people believe that anything produced naturally is good for you. That's the basis of the organic food craze.

    Just because a chemical is man-made, however, does not mean that it's bad for you. Many drugs are artificial compounds, but they have huge benefits.

    Likewise, just because something occurs in nature doesn't mean that it's good for you. Aflatoxins, for example, are all-natural:

    Aflatoxin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Jupiter, Florida, United States
    Posts
    1,575

    Default

    I have to agree with Popologist on this one. Just because it is man made does not mean it is bad for you.
    IMO the man made ingredients can substitute for the flavor or sweetner while not having the negative impact on the body. For instance, when a pure cane sugar drink is ingested the body will be triggered to raise insulin levels and start to store the carbohydrates as fuel for later,,,,hence, fat accumaulation. When an artifical sweetner is used the mechanism that triggers responses on receptor sites are essentally void so no reaction takes place, therefore no fat accumulation.

    With that being said there are exceptions, some artificial sweeteners, known as sugar alcohols, can allow for the same process to occur or not occur but will wreak havoc on the digestive system beause these will be attempted to be broken down as regular carbohydrates and absorbed through the intestines but the body will not be able to do so resulting in severe cramping. Uusally the sugar alcohols are found in low sugar or no sugar candies and just a few drinks.
    Whether you think can or think you can\'t, you\'re probably right!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Chicago,IL
    Posts
    4,552

    Default

    I too agree with Poplogist and Greg.
    Mater (atomic) is universal to all elements
    maintained on the earth. Grown from the ground
    up, mater is equal to mater created by man.

    a simple view of atomic structure
    Last edited by Mr Zabe; 01-07-2009 at 03:16 PM.
    Don't worry, be happy. Meher Baba

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    92

    Default Natural

    Stevia typically undergoes a natural refining process. So you have a natural product that is rifined without chemicals. This is why stevia is considered a natural product. Im sure there are extraction techniques that could involve chems but I don't believe it's standard practice.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Douglas, WY
    Posts
    1,229

    Default

    I agree too, a lot of mincing of words here depending on who you are talking to. There's the government's definition of whatever "natural" is supposed to be. Yet, how much refining does it take to make granulated sugar? Is the result "natural"? Of course not, it's not like picking a fruit off of the old Sugar Tree, squeezing the juice out of it and putting it in your cola!. However, the source was natural, even if the processing wasn't. I don't know how much processing it actually takes to produce a Stevia sweetener, but I think I'd lean more towards grouping it into the same category as sugar. (Uh, so what does, "natural refining process" mean then?)

    Remember all the fuss over sucralose? That's a derivative of sugar, but chemically altered to make it undigestable, so to me that's more on the chemists/artificial side of the column.

    -Andy
    Give me some cane sugar real Pepsi in a glass bottle... and not Throwback!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joey View Post
    Stevia typically undergoes a natural refining process. So you have a natural product that is refined without chemicals. This is why stevia is considered a natural product. Im sure there are extraction techniques that could involve chems but I don't believe it's standard practice.
    What Joey said.

    It is a plant extract, not something that Monsanto or Dow created in a lab. Not saying that makes it better or worse for you, just saying that is what it is & isn't.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •