Chimp Food

by Chimp Food

Product Type

Functional: Protein Drinks and Supplements

Container

16oz Plastic

Nutritional Info

Nutritional information is not available for this product.

Ingredients

ORANGES, APPLES, BANANAS, CHERRIES, PEACHES, BLACKBERRIES, BLUEBERRIES, CRANBERRIES, RASPBERRIES, STRAWBERRIES, ARUGULA, BROCCOLI, CARROTS, SPINACH, SWEET POTATOES, ALMONDS, CASHEWS, PECANS, PISTACHIOS, WALNUTS, CHIA SEEDS FLAX SEEDS, PUMPKIN SEEDS, SESAME SEEDS, SUNFLOWER SEEDS, WATER ORANGE JUICE & STEVIA LEAVES

Bevnet Rating
4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars
User rating
(1 votes)
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Review: Orange

Posted: Sep 24, 2013 at 12:00 AM (Last Updated: Apr 09, 2014 at 1:34 PM)
Like the other flavors of Chimp Food, the Orange variety is a blend of 25 “whole superfoods” including fruits, vegetables, seeds and nuts. It’s also slightly sweetened with stevia. Unlike other smoothie or juice products, Chimp Food uses the entire fruit or vegetable, including stems, skins, rinds and seeds. This results in a product that’s thick, slightly gritty and very unique in flavor. For this variety, it’s noticeable even in the orange flavor, which, thanks to the use of the skin (and the oil contained in it), has a very sharp, rather than sweet, orange flavor. This sets the stage nicely for the rich and complex flavor of the product. It’s honestly otherwise pretty difficult to single out ingredients from the mix, but they do work very harmoniously together. The only thing that’s a slight head scratcher is the stevia, which adds a little bit to the finish. The product doesn’t seem to be lacking in natural sweetness, and we bet that adding a bit more sweet fruit wouldn’t make any consumers bat an eye at a slight change in the nutrition facts. Beyond that, the only thing that would improve it would be to use organic ingredients. On the outside, the branding definitely catches your eye, but the visual execution feels like it needs a bit of polish. This starts with the placement of the flavor name. From there, we think the company should refocus its “not a juice” callout into a succinct explanation of what it is in beverage terms (“whole food meal replacement smoothie” is our best guess). Finally, mentioning the fact that it’s high pressure processed versus pasteurized would be a good idea. Overall, there’s definitely some room for improvement, but it’s a great start out of the gate, and it could be a game-changer for the juice and smoothie cooler.

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